Milk canister with dairy processing workers in background

Keeping Dairy Safe

Denis Storey
November 3, 2019

eBook: The Struggle for Safer Dairy Standards

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eBook: The Struggle for Safer Dairy Standards

The FDA mandates the implementation of FDA-regulated hazard analysis and critical control point programs. These protocols are meant to prevent hazards in the production process that can lead to contamination. TraceGains helps dairy companies automate and digitize regulatory compliance for complete supply chain visibility.

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Instances of food contamination and allergic reactions have become all too common at a time when the technology and regulations put in place to prevent them have never been more robust. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that each year roughly one in six Americans (or 48 million people) gets sick, 128,000 have a hospital stay, and 3,000 dies of foodborne diseases.  

Dairy Industry Contamination Controls

A hundred years ago, The U.S. Public Health Service set up a set of sanitation rules to protect two groups of vulnerable individuals from contaminated dairy products, the very young and older adults.

Children and Allergies

According to a 2018 study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, 7.6% of children in the United States have food allergies, peanuts, milk, and shellfish are the most common offenders. The CDC estimates anywhere between 2% and 3% of babies are born with dairy allergies.

In cooperation with state regulatory agencies, the dairy industry, and the federal government, the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance set up minimal requirements to protect the public. In interstate commerce and trade with other countries, the PMO assures what enters or leaves the United States is safe and wholesome. The states have adopted the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance and with it, a requirement to meet all local public health agency requirements as well, which may be revised, adjusted, or added to based on local conditions.

FSMA and the Dairy Industry

Until the Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) became law in 2011, no federal law existed that governed the dairy supply chain. Now, dairy producers are subject to the “focused mitigation strategies to protect food against intentional adulteration” rule. This provision mandates the implementation of FDA-regulated hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) programs. These protocols help prevent hazards in the production process that can lead to contamination. The law required all dairy producers to comply by Sept. 17, 2018.

Any Easy Way to Keep Consumers Safe

Modern dairy companies understand the regulatory and consumer demands to ensure quality and safety with their products. The right technology can make meeting these demands easier. 

If your team manages suppliers and required supply chain documentation manually, it could be costing you time and money and exposing your business to unnecessary risk. TraceGains works with more than thirty leading dairy companies like Organic Valley, HP Hood, and Agri-Mark to automate supplier and document management, allowing these companies to do more with fewer resources. 

To learn more, download our complimentary eBook “Dairy: The Struggle for Safer Standards.”

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